Danika the Lesbrarian



-yawn- It’s midnight, an hour and a half after our plane was supposed to leave, and I’m still in the airport. Which means we missed our connecting flight. They’ll be rescheduling it, they said. It’s a good thing we have a buffer day, though it does shorten our time at Universal Studios and our sleep.

12:04 am, by lesbrary
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tagged: leakycon, me,






LEAKYCONLEAKYCONLEAKYCONleakycon. Leakycon. Leakycon!







Anonymous said: You are so fucking fat

whatfreshhellisthis:







fuckoffallies:

airgeatlamh:

JK Rowling said she would have made Seamus/Dean canon but she felt it would be distracting from the main trio

Literally how much space do you need to have a line about Dean asking Seamus to the Yule ball

Look, I’ll try

"Parvati had tried to ask Dean to the ball, but he told her he was going with Seamus instead."

DONE

That’s the most bullshit excuse. Those are big books, there were plenty of opportunities to slip it in. Like she could have described them holding hands when they were together. Or have one of them refer to the other as a boyfriend. Its not that hard.

I’ve been googling this and can’t find any source for it other than tumblr…

(Source: dad-rock-davos)







bosshuton:

her song makes me cry

bosshuton:

her song makes me cry

8:23 am, reblogged by lesbrary
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tagged: tara maclay,







And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.







I just need to share that this book exists.

Both a radical feminist history and a street art resource, this handbook combines short biographies with striking and usable stencil images of 30 female activists, anarchists, feminists, freedom fighters, and visionaries. From Harriet Tubman, Emma Goldman, and Angela Davis to Vandana Shiva, Sylvia Rivera, and Lucy Parsons, this collection offers a subversive portrait celebrating the military prowess and revolutionary drive of these women whose violent resolve often shatters the archetype of woman as nurturer. A sampling of quotes from key writings and speeches gives voice to each womans ideologies, philosophies, struggles, and quiet humanity while the stencils offer further opportunities to commemorate these women and their actions through the reproduction of their likenesses.

7:46 pm, by lesbrary
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tagged: feminism, graffiti, street art,






ryansallans:

Our history is what has created our present day. Never forget the paths others have walked to pave the next step we take. 
"Rivera’s telling of the events of that evening, June 28, 1969, is probably best as is. The  speech below, delivered a year before her death, is soaked with frustration of a lifetime of having to fight both outer-movement forces as well as those within who wished to erase trans identities and write us out of legislation.

"The night of the Stonewall [riots], it happened to be the week that Judy Garland had committed suicide. Some people say that the riots started because of Judy Garland’s death. That’s a myth. We were all involved in different struggles, including myself and many other transgender people. But in these struggles, in the Civil Rights movement, in the war movement, in the women’s movement, we were still outcasts. The only reason they tolerated the transgender community in some of these movements was because we were gung-ho, we were front liners. We didn’t take no shit from nobody. We had nothing to lose. You all had rights. We had nothing to lose. I’ll be the first one to step on any organization, any politician’s toes if I have to, to get the rights for my community.
"Back to the story: we were all in the bar, having a good time. Lights flashed on, we knew what was coming — it’s a raid. This is the second time in one week that the bar was raided. Common practice says the police from the 6th Precinct would come in to each gay bar and collect their payoff. Routine was, ‘Faggots over here, dykes over here, and freaks over there,’ referring to my side of the community. If you did not have three pieces of male attire on you, you were going to jail. Just like a butch dyke would have to have three pieces of female clothing, or he was going to jail. The night goes on, you know, they proof you for ID, you know, back then you could get away with anything. Fake IDs were great back then, because I wasn’t even 18 yet. I was gonna turn 18. We are led out of the bar. The routine was that the cops get their payoff, they confiscate the liquor, if you were a bartender you would snatch the money as soon as the lights went on because you would never see that money again. A padlock would go on the door. What we did, back then, was disappear to a coffee shop or any place in the neighborhood for 15 minutes. You come back, the Mafia was there cutting the padlock off, bringing in more liquor, and back to business as usual.
"Well, it just so happened that that night it was muggy; everybody was being, I guess, cranky; a lot of us were involved in different struggles; and instead of dispersing, we went across the street. Part of history forgets, that as the cops are inside the bar, the confrontation started outside by throwing change at the police. We started with the pennies, the nickels, the quarters, and the dimes. ‘Here’s your payoff, you pigs! You fucking pigs! Get out of our faces.’ This was started by the street queens of that era, which I was part of, Marsha P. Johnson, and many others that are not here. I’m lucky to be 50 in July, but I’m still here and I’ll be damned if I won’t see 100.
"One thing led to another. The confrontation got so hot, that Inspector [Seymour] Pine, who headed this raid — him and his men had to barricade themselves in our bar, because they could not get out. The people that they had arrested, they had to take into the bar with them, because there was no police backup for them. But seriously, as history tells it, to this day, we don’t know who cut the phone lines! So they could not get the call to the 6th Precinct. Number one, Inspector Pine was not welcome in the 6th Precinct because he had just been appointed to stop the corruption and, you know, what they called back then, we were a bunch of deviants, perverts. So he was there for that purpose, so who knows if one of his own men didn’t do it, that was, you know, taking a payoff himself.
"The police and the people that were arrested were barricaded inside this bar, with a Village Voice reporter, who proceeded to tell his story, in the paper, that he was handed a gun. The cops were actually so afraid of us that night that if we had busted through that bar’s door, they were gonna shoot. They were ordered to shoot if that door busted open. Someone yanked a parking meter out the floor, which was loose, because it’s very hard to get a parking meter out of the ground. It was loose, you know, I don’t know how it got loose. But that was being rammed into the door.
"People have also asked me, ‘Was it a pre-planned riot?,’ because out of nowhere, Molotov cocktails showed up. I have been given the credit for throwing the first Molotov cocktail by many historians but I always like to correct it; I threw the second one, I did not throw the first one! And I didn’t even know what a Molotov cocktail was; I’m holding this thing that’s lit and I’m like ‘What the hell am I supposed to do with this?’ ‘Throw it before it blows!’ ‘OK!’"
Read the whole article here. 

ryansallans:

Our history is what has created our present day. Never forget the paths others have walked to pave the next step we take. 

"Rivera’s telling of the events of that evening, June 28, 1969, is probably best as is. The  speech below, delivered a year before her death, is soaked with frustration of a lifetime of having to fight both outer-movement forces as well as those within who wished to erase trans identities and write us out of legislation.

"The night of the Stonewall [riots], it happened to be the week that Judy Garland had committed suicide. Some people say that the riots started because of Judy Garland’s death. That’s a myth. We were all involved in different struggles, including myself and many other transgender people. But in these struggles, in the Civil Rights movement, in the war movement, in the women’s movement, we were still outcasts. The only reason they tolerated the transgender community in some of these movements was because we were gung-ho, we were front liners. We didn’t take no shit from nobody. We had nothing to lose. You all had rights. We had nothing to lose. I’ll be the first one to step on any organization, any politician’s toes if I have to, to get the rights for my community.

"Back to the story: we were all in the bar, having a good time. Lights flashed on, we knew what was coming — it’s a raid. This is the second time in one week that the bar was raided. Common practice says the police from the 6th Precinct would come in to each gay bar and collect their payoff. Routine was, ‘Faggots over here, dykes over here, and freaks over there,’ referring to my side of the community. If you did not have three pieces of male attire on you, you were going to jail. Just like a butch dyke would have to have three pieces of female clothing, or he was going to jail. The night goes on, you know, they proof you for ID, you know, back then you could get away with anything. Fake IDs were great back then, because I wasn’t even 18 yet. I was gonna turn 18. We are led out of the bar. The routine was that the cops get their payoff, they confiscate the liquor, if you were a bartender you would snatch the money as soon as the lights went on because you would never see that money again. A padlock would go on the door. What we did, back then, was disappear to a coffee shop or any place in the neighborhood for 15 minutes. You come back, the Mafia was there cutting the padlock off, bringing in more liquor, and back to business as usual.

"Well, it just so happened that that night it was muggy; everybody was being, I guess, cranky; a lot of us were involved in different struggles; and instead of dispersing, we went across the street. Part of history forgets, that as the cops are inside the bar, the confrontation started outside by throwing change at the police. We started with the pennies, the nickels, the quarters, and the dimes. ‘Here’s your payoff, you pigs! You fucking pigs! Get out of our faces.’ This was started by the street queens of that era, which I was part of, Marsha P. Johnson, and many others that are not here. I’m lucky to be 50 in July, but I’m still here and I’ll be damned if I won’t see 100.

"One thing led to another. The confrontation got so hot, that Inspector [Seymour] Pine, who headed this raid — him and his men had to barricade themselves in our bar, because they could not get out. The people that they had arrested, they had to take into the bar with them, because there was no police backup for them. But seriously, as history tells it, to this day, we don’t know who cut the phone lines! So they could not get the call to the 6th Precinct. Number one, Inspector Pine was not welcome in the 6th Precinct because he had just been appointed to stop the corruption and, you know, what they called back then, we were a bunch of deviants, perverts. So he was there for that purpose, so who knows if one of his own men didn’t do it, that was, you know, taking a payoff himself.

"The police and the people that were arrested were barricaded inside this bar, with a Village Voice reporter, who proceeded to tell his story, in the paper, that he was handed a gun. The cops were actually so afraid of us that night that if we had busted through that bar’s door, they were gonna shoot. They were ordered to shoot if that door busted open. Someone yanked a parking meter out the floor, which was loose, because it’s very hard to get a parking meter out of the ground. It was loose, you know, I don’t know how it got loose. But that was being rammed into the door.

"People have also asked me, ‘Was it a pre-planned riot?,’ because out of nowhere, Molotov cocktails showed up. I have been given the credit for throwing the first Molotov cocktail by many historians but I always like to correct it; I threw the second one, I did not throw the first one! And I didn’t even know what a Molotov cocktail was; I’m holding this thing that’s lit and I’m like ‘What the hell am I supposed to do with this?’ ‘Throw it before it blows!’ ‘OK!’"

Read the whole article here. 








charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos







unimpressed2chainz:

nooooooooooooooo
oooooooooooooooooooooo

unimpressed2chainz:

nooooooooooooooo

oooooooooooooooooooooo

6:22 pm, reblogged by lesbrary
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tagged: Harry Potter,